Eversheds Sutherland Cybersecurity and Privacy Insights Blog
content top

WhatsApp enables end-to-end encryption as response

On Tuesday, May 3, 2016, the popular messaging application WhatsApp enabled end-to-end encryption for all of its users.  End-to-end encryption technology prevents messages sent via the application from being intercepted or viewed by any individual except the intended recipient.  To further ensure the privacy of its users, WhatsApp will not have the technical capability to turn over...

The Six Lawsuits All GCs Face After a Data Breach

There are many types of litigation likely to arise following a data breach. For more information on the different types of actions that could be initiated by consumers, financial institutions, insurers, shareholders, employees and government agencies after a cyberattack, view this Law360...

U.S. Court of Appeals Upholds FTC’s Authority to Regulate Cybersecurity

Today, the United States Court of Appeals for Third Circuit issued its opinion in FTC v. Wyndham Worldwide Corp. upholding the authority of the Federal Trade Commission to regulate corporate cybersecurity under Section 5(a) of the Federal Trade Commission Act, which prohibits businesses from engaging in “unfair or deceptive acts or practices.” This case was an interlocutory appeal from...

These Shoes Weren’t Made for Walking (and They Aren’t Too Good for Standing Either): Court Dismisses Post-Breach Case Against Zappos for Lack of Standing

Last week yet another federal district court dismissed a post-data breach class action after concluding that the plaintiffs had not alleged any actual or imminent harm and, consequently, did not have standing to proceed. In re Zappos.com, Inc. Customer Data Security Breach Litig. MDL No. 2357, 12-cv-325 (D. Nev. June 1, 2015), arose out of a 2012 breach of Zappos’ servers, which...

Recent Data Breach Insurance Coverage Decision: Court Holds Insurer Not Obligated to Cover Damages from Lost Tapes Containing Personal Information When No Evidence Tapes Were Read

The Connecticut Supreme Court recently issued an opinion confirming that a Commercial General Liability (CGL) policy’s personal or advertising injury coverage did not provide coverage for damages resulting from lost data storage tapes where the tapes contained personal identifying information, but the party seeking coverage could not show that the tapes had been accessed.  Recall Total...

« Older Entries